Berklemusic-Triads in Root Position 3 (cont.)  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

Now let's try the same triads, only in a different order. In contemporary, jazz, and popular music, chords frequently move in intervals of a fourth up (or a fifth down). If we move from chord to chord by intervals of a fourth, we arrive at what is called the cycle of fourths, also known as "cycle 4," shown below. A cycle is defined as a series of events that recur regularly and usually lead back to the starting point. If you start at any note and continue around the wheel to the note that is up by a fourth, you will eventually end up back at the same note. In so doing, you will have covered all twelve notes in the chromatic scale, without repetition.

This serves as a useful reference to allow you to take anything through all twelve keys. Although not as intuitive as half-step motion on the guitar neck, knowledge of this set of key relationships will help prepare you to play the countless songs whose chords move in intervals of fourths, including thousands of blues, rock, r&b, and jazz tunes. If this is new to you, don't worry. You'll get a lot of practice with it. In fact, let's start using this approach to the twelve keys now.

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/L1-ex5.pdf

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5a.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5a_2.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5b.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/ex1.5b_2.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5cw.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5cn.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6a2.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6a2m.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6b.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6bm.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6c.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6cm.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7a.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7am.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7b.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7bm.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7c.mp3.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7cm.mp3


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Berklemusic-Triads in Root Position 2 (cont.)  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

To get used to the sound of the major triad, let's practice playing major triads up the fretboard, one fret at a time, on the top string set 1-2-3. While difficult to execute on most musical instruments, moving up one fret at a time, also called "in half-steps," on the guitar neck is one of the easiest ways to accustom yourself to a voicing shape.

1. Play major triads in all twelve keys, moving up the fretboard one fret at a time, in half steps on the first set of three strings, as shown in figure 1.1 of page 1. Play a triad based on each of these notes.

Please Note: All playing exercises include an Interactive Exercise (Guitar Pick button) which allows you to follow and play along with the music, as well as MP3 and PDF downloads that allow you to practice at your own pace. It is recommended to download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader to view all PDF downloads.
http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/L1-ex3a.pdf
http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.3b.mp3


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Berkleemusic-Triads in Root Position  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

Major Triads

A chord is a set of three or more notes sounded simultaneously. If the notes are played one after the other, it is called an arpeggio.

Triads are three-note chords. They are built upwards in intervals of thirds from a fundamental note, called a root, which is like the tonic of a scale. The major triad includes the tonic, third, and fifth of the major scale built on the triad's root.

Each of these notes is described by a number corresponding to its scale degree (or interval) away from the root: 1, 3, 5. These numbers are referred to as "functions," as in "E functions as the third of a C major triad."

Play the following C major scale, triad, and arpeggio now.


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Posted by T ZAMAN in ,


Welcome to Berkleemusic.com, Berklee College of Music’s
online extension school. Berkleemusic offers a growing catalog of accredited
online courses and certificate programs in all areas of contemporary music,
including songwriting, arranging, production, education, music business,
and performance. If you are looking to enhance your career opportunities,
develop your skills, or connect with like-minded musicians, Berkleemusic has
something for you. I invite you to explore our Web site to discover the many
ways Berkleemusic.com can help you achieve your goals.


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Berklemusic-Free Guitar Lesson  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

Introduction

The longer I've played the guitar, the more it's become clear that chordal playing and melodic playing on the guitar amount to two sides of the same coin. The more time I've spent working with chords--all of the variations and possibilities-the easier it has become to look down at the fretboard while playing and see more options. A clear understanding of chordal shapes on the guitar leads to a thorough understanding of the instrument. Let's get to work.  

  Music Theory Primer



While this course is designed for students with little to no music theory background, there is some basic vocabulary we need
to know in order to discuss how to construct chords. Before you go any further, be sure to read through this music theory primer. I suggest bookmarking this page or downloading the Flash animation so that you can refer to it any time you have a question throughout the course.

Please review the . This is a brief overview of some basic music theory concepts that you will be seeing in this course.


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