Inside AdSense: Stick 'em up!  

Posted by T ZAMAN

Inside AdSense: Stick 'em up!
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Bohamian Rhapsody For Solo Guitar  

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EZ Guitar Tabs  

Posted by T ZAMAN

Quick access to guitar tabs of your favorite tunes. Add in the song title, artist/band and any other details you would like to. Store and manage your top picks in one easy-to-use location.

  • Built-in ability to Search your own collection, or search the web for tabs
  • Sort by title, artist, album, genre, and year
  • Add as many tabs as you want
  • Print your tabs directly from the EZ Guitar Tabs interface
  • Add additional notes and a picture for each tab entry

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EZ Guitar Tabs  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

Quick access to guitar tabs of your favorite tunes. Add in the song title, artist/band and any other details you would like to. Store and manage your top picks in one easy-to-use location.

  • Built-in ability to Search your own collection, or search the web for tabs
  • Sort by title, artist, album, genre, and year
  • Add as many tabs as you want
  • Print your tabs directly from the EZ Guitar Tabs interface
  • Add additional notes and a picture for each tab entry
Download Now
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Berklemusic-Triads in Root Position 3 (cont.)  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

Now let's try the same triads, only in a different order. In contemporary, jazz, and popular music, chords frequently move in intervals of a fourth up (or a fifth down). If we move from chord to chord by intervals of a fourth, we arrive at what is called the cycle of fourths, also known as "cycle 4," shown below. A cycle is defined as a series of events that recur regularly and usually lead back to the starting point. If you start at any note and continue around the wheel to the note that is up by a fourth, you will eventually end up back at the same note. In so doing, you will have covered all twelve notes in the chromatic scale, without repetition.

This serves as a useful reference to allow you to take anything through all twelve keys. Although not as intuitive as half-step motion on the guitar neck, knowledge of this set of key relationships will help prepare you to play the countless songs whose chords move in intervals of fourths, including thousands of blues, rock, r&b, and jazz tunes. If this is new to you, don't worry. You'll get a lot of practice with it. In fact, let's start using this approach to the twelve keys now.

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/L1-ex5.pdf

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5a.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5a_2.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5b.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/ex1.5b_2.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5cw.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.5cn.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6a2.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6a2m.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6b.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6bm.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6c.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.6cm.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7a.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7am.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7b.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7bm.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7c.mp3.mp3

http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.7cm.mp3


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Berklemusic-Triads in Root Position 2 (cont.)  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

To get used to the sound of the major triad, let's practice playing major triads up the fretboard, one fret at a time, on the top string set 1-2-3. While difficult to execute on most musical instruments, moving up one fret at a time, also called "in half-steps," on the guitar neck is one of the easiest ways to accustom yourself to a voicing shape.

1. Play major triads in all twelve keys, moving up the fretboard one fret at a time, in half steps on the first set of three strings, as shown in figure 1.1 of page 1. Play a triad based on each of these notes.

Please Note: All playing exercises include an Interactive Exercise (Guitar Pick button) which allows you to follow and play along with the music, as well as MP3 and PDF downloads that allow you to practice at your own pace. It is recommended to download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader to view all PDF downloads.
http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/L1-ex3a.pdf
http://www.berkleemusic.com/welcome/freelessons/guitar/assets/lesson1MP3s/Ex1.3b.mp3


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Berkleemusic-Triads in Root Position  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

Major Triads

A chord is a set of three or more notes sounded simultaneously. If the notes are played one after the other, it is called an arpeggio.

Triads are three-note chords. They are built upwards in intervals of thirds from a fundamental note, called a root, which is like the tonic of a scale. The major triad includes the tonic, third, and fifth of the major scale built on the triad's root.

Each of these notes is described by a number corresponding to its scale degree (or interval) away from the root: 1, 3, 5. These numbers are referred to as "functions," as in "E functions as the third of a C major triad."

Play the following C major scale, triad, and arpeggio now.


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Posted by T ZAMAN in ,


Welcome to Berkleemusic.com, Berklee College of Music’s
online extension school. Berkleemusic offers a growing catalog of accredited
online courses and certificate programs in all areas of contemporary music,
including songwriting, arranging, production, education, music business,
and performance. If you are looking to enhance your career opportunities,
develop your skills, or connect with like-minded musicians, Berkleemusic has
something for you. I invite you to explore our Web site to discover the many
ways Berkleemusic.com can help you achieve your goals.


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Berklemusic-Free Guitar Lesson  

Posted by T ZAMAN in ,

Introduction

The longer I've played the guitar, the more it's become clear that chordal playing and melodic playing on the guitar amount to two sides of the same coin. The more time I've spent working with chords--all of the variations and possibilities-the easier it has become to look down at the fretboard while playing and see more options. A clear understanding of chordal shapes on the guitar leads to a thorough understanding of the instrument. Let's get to work.  

  Music Theory Primer



While this course is designed for students with little to no music theory background, there is some basic vocabulary we need
to know in order to discuss how to construct chords. Before you go any further, be sure to read through this music theory primer. I suggest bookmarking this page or downloading the Flash animation so that you can refer to it any time you have a question throughout the course.

Please review the . This is a brief overview of some basic music theory concepts that you will be seeing in this course.


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Earl Klugh Interview and Lesson  

Posted by T ZAMAN in , ,

Earl Klugh Music Examples

Earl Klugh is smiling broadly on the cover of his latest release, The Spice of Life, as if the photographer caught him in a moment of pure joy. Such moments are well deserved for Klugh, who, with the release of Spice, has a lot to smile about. The album offers a satisfying mix of moods—from the easy breeziness of "Ocean Blue" to an elegant rendering of the jazz standard "My Foolish Heart" to the poignant "Venezuelan Nights," which was inspired by the waltzes of Venezuelan composer Antonio Lauro. Spice's variety makes for an intriguing listen, and it's just that sort of variety that has propelled Klugh's career for more than three decades.

Besides variety, the other constant in the Detroit-born guitarist's career has always been balance. Time and again, he has established himself as an artist with a knack for making music that's not only celebrated by fellow musicians and jazz aficionados but is also accessible to casual listeners. Few players of his generation—or any generation—have built such universally successful careers. Perhaps only two come easily to mind—Chet Atkins and George Benson, both of whom Klugh befriended and recorded and performed with. As a younger player, Klugh assimilated some of the concepts he'd heard in their music. When he later met his heroes, they encouraged him to find his own musical path. Benson, in particular, advised him to focus his efforts on the nylon-string acoustic and to avoid getting distracted by the electric guitar. "George really encouraged me in that direction," Klugh says. "He said, 'This is exactly what you should be doing. Don't worry about trying to play both instruments.' It was good advice." And, again, Klugh is smiling.

Klugh surely has found his own guitaristic voice, and that voice is the central element on all of his recordings. From a playerly perspective, however, it's his two solo-guitar releases—Solo Guitar (Warner Brothers, 1989) and Naked Guitar (Koch, 2005)—that highlight his sound and ideas most clearly. One thing that sets Klugh apart from many other solo players is that he's able to generate forward momentum without reverting to four-beats-to-the-bar chording or walking bass lines. Instead, he renders swinging melodic lines, punctuating them with chordal jabs on the beats between phrases. He makes it look easy, but this is sophisticated stuff.

I met with Klugh in New York City last summer to talk about his approach to solo playing, and throughout our interview the guitar never left his lap. Alternately playing and chatting, Klugh talked about his approach and influences—Atkins, Benson, and beyond. He began our session with an extended improvisation on the classic jazz tune "It Could Happen to You," modulating through several keys and exploring the guitar in every practical register.

That's a great workout—playing one song through so many keys. Is that part of your practice routine?

KLUGH I like to do that as much as I can. It comes in handy. I sometimes worked with singers back when I lived in Detroit, and I'd have to play jazz standards in their keys. Then I'd work with horn players or organ players, and everybody wanted to play in Bb, F, and Eb.

When you're arranging a particular piece, how do you decide on the best key?

KLUGH Picking the key has to do with keeping the register where it's not too high and not too low. You want to make sure you don't run out of room on the neck for the melody—that's one thing. I might modulate to a key that's not necessarily a good melody key but would be the key I'd improvise in. In the end, I always try to get back to where the guitar sings the melody best.

Could you talk about how you first got into jazz?

KLUGH Early on, I'd been a big Chet Atkins fan, and Laurindo Almeida—that kind of thing. Then I heard Wes Montgomery. I liked the work Wes did with [producer] Creed Taylor and, from that, I found his other records. When Wes passed [in '68], I was still too young to go to nightclubs, but I kept hearing about "the new guy"—George Benson. I figured, ok, I'll check him out, but he can't possibly be anywhere as good as Wes. But he was pretty amazing. That's what got me into the whole thing.

When I was old enough, I went to hear George at Baker's Keyboard Lounge—a Detroit jazz club that's been there since the '30s. I saw a lot of people there. I'd go every Friday and Saturday night. It was an education, because jazz didn't come into play for me until I was 18 or 19 years old. That's pretty old to get initiated. It opened up a whole different world to me.

Was Benson the first great guitarist you had a chance to see live?

KLUGH Yes.

After hearing him on record, did anything about his approach surprise you when you got to watch him?

KLUGH He was playing amazing things, but it didn't seem like his hands were doing that much. I mean, sometimes he'd just go, but basically it was all within one position or another. When you listen to his records, you imagine he's going up and down all over the neck, but it really wasn't like that. It's interesting—now that he's older, he's even more economical.

This economy is a striking element of your own solo-guitar as well; you use small chord voicings to great effect.

KLUGH I really try to visualize the guitar more like the piano—particularly the way Bill Evans would play. I've listened to his records for countless hours. He had so much expression, and there was economy in a lot of the things he did, in his voicings—all that close harmony. I felt a kinship with that approach.

So you've cultivated that in your own style?

KLUGH Yes, over time. Since I'm not a plectrum player at all, and I don't have terribly fast right-hand technique, I tried to find something else that would be musically interesting for myself and for whoever cared to listen. A guitarist can't really do everything a piano player does, but you can get that feeling going. When you really get into a piece, you can get it going and keep swinging it.



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Play along with the Full Team Method Band!  

Posted by T ZAMAN in , ,

here will be three parts to this lesson. First, I will show you another warm up pattern, then show you the song's lyrics and how the chords work with them, finally we will get you playing along with the band. This final part should be fun and easy as you have already mastered the song and it should be a matter of just doing what you have already done but with accompanyment of instruments.

Ok. Let's get into another one of our warm up techniques. This one will once again use all your fingers and all the strings. The following pattern is similar to those that I have already shown you, so you should have no problem playing it. Now, as always I would like you to use correct fingering. The correct finger will be written out below the TAB.

You will have noticed that when there is a zero on the above tab there is no fingering indicated. That is because a zero indicates an open fret, therefore you don't need to use a finger to push down on the string. Keep working with this pattern until you feel that you are playing it smoothly.

Ok. Now we can get into the more exciting part of the lesson - playing with the band. This should be a lot of fun. Play along with the band in the following JAM track:

Audio
Audio Backing Band mp3 (5.34 MB)

Did you do it? If you feel like you are not quite getting it completly right, try again. Remember you can always refer back to lesson 5 and the TAB if you forget. Keep working at it and you will get it down.

A lot of people who want to learn to play the guitar, learn so they can sing and play. For this reason we have added a track with the band but no singer. If you want to you can sing along with the band.

Audio
Audio Backing Band without vocals mp3 (5.35 MB)

If you need a copy of the words, I have written them out for you below.

Chorus:
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me.

Verse 2:
Yonder come miss rosie, how in the world did you know?
By the way she wears her apron, and the clothes she wore.
Umbrella on her shoulder, piece of paper in her hand;
She come to see the govnor, she wants to free her man.

Chorus:
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me.

Verse 3:
If you’re ever in Houston, well, you better do the right;
You better not gamble, there, you better not fight, at all
Or the sheriff will grab ya and the boys will bring you down.
The next thing you know, boy, oh! You’re prison bound

Chorus:
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me.

Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me,
Let the midnight special shine a light on me.


Awesome! You have now come to the end of our six part mini-course. Click on the link to see or hear a personal message from Ben Edwards.

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up (Audio) Broadband (Video)
MP3 - Audio Message (1.3 MB)

QuickTime - Video Message (5.49 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Video Message ( 5.52 MB)

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Playing 'The Midnight Special'.  

Posted by T ZAMAN in , ,

The song 'The Midnight Special' uses predominantly the chords A and D, and at the end of the song you will need to play the chord G. You will notice that these are chords that you have already learned, so you should have no problems playing and changing between them. Also you will notice the strum used in the song is exactly the same as the strum that we practiced in lesson 4.

Now, I realise that this song might not be in the style that you are specifically into, but it is a good song to just get you started at playing something and using the chords that you have learned. In the full JTeam Method course, we cover many more styles including pop, rock, jazz, blues, metal and funk. So don't be worried if this song is not your thing. It's just there to get you up and rolling, and stringing some chords together.

Today we will be using chords that you already know and using a strum that you have already practiced. Not only that, we have practiced using both these chords and this strum with changes. So you can see how we have systematically built you up, so that playing this song is just another simple step in developing your playing.

Today, like yesterday, I am going to teach you a new warm up pattern. This one will be a touch more difficult than the last few. This pattern starts on the first fret and the sixth string (thickest string). You will play all six strings and use all your fingers. As always with these exercises, I would like you to use the correct fingering.

Warm up:

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 1 (1.25 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (2.79 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 1 (3.35 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (4.54 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 1 (712 KB)

In the above warmup, you will have noticed that the frets you play have the same numbers as the fingers you use. This should make it easy to remember what to play. So now after playing that, your fingers should be warmed up and ready to play.

Let's move onto learning 'The Midnight Special'...

As you already know how to play the chords and the strum for the song, all we really need to work on today with this lesson is getting you to remember the changes and getting into the feel of the song. The first part of ‘The Midnight Special’ is the chord D followed by the chord G. Interestingly the WHOLE song uses the same structure, the guitar plays the same progression in both the verses and the choruses. In tomorrows lesson I will also give you a chance to play along with other instruments, but today we will try and work with a singer and your guitar.

You will have noticed by now that I like to break things down and give them to you in small, manageable steps. Nothing is going to change for this lesson. There are going to be four parts to this lesson. Firstly I want you to listen to the song, then I want you to try and play it by yourself, thirdly I would like you to play it with another guitar, and finally we will get you playing it with a singer. I have broken it down into parts like this so that you should have no problems taking each step forward.

Now I would like you to just listen to the song. You will hear that there are only two instruments playing (note; it is common to hear the ‘voice’ being called an instrument). Listen carefully to the guitar part, you will be able to hear that it holds the song together and maintains its rhythm.

Audio:
'The Midnight Special' mp3 (5.34 MB)

Ok. So, listening to that you would have noticed that the guitar is laying down the rhythm of the song with the singer coming out over the top. That is the goal of a good rhythm guitarist, to lay down a solid groove so the singer can be clearly heard and the rhythm of the song is maintained.

Now you have heard what the song should sound like, I am going to give you a chance to play the start of it. Below I will TAB out what I would like you to play and the strum I would like you to use. This song starts in D, continues for two bars then changes for two bars of G before it returns for two more bars of D, it then finally goes to two bars of A. The strum used, is exactly the same as the one we looked at in lesson 4, so you should have no problems linking in with it.

This is the longest piece of TAB I have asked you to read and play along with, but like I said you have done all the parts of it before. Now is the time to put it all together and play. This time I would like you to just try and play in your own time. I would like you to consider this a piece Section. Play this piece of music until you feel you are getting it together. Make sure that it is tight and sweet sounding before you move on to the next. One last thing... all the tracks in this lesson have a click in period of 2 measures (8 clicks) before you start playing. So, when you play the following exercise, wait for 8 clicks before starting.

The Midnight Special (Section 1)

Audio Available:

Audio Audio mp3 - Exercise 2 (896 KB)

Once you feel like you have mastered that piece I want you to practice it some more, and then some more as in essence that same section repeated over and over is the entire song! The song structure is simple and easy to follow. I have written out how many times you play the chord progression section below:

The Midnight Special (structure)

  • Chorus) Play section 1 twice
  • Verse 2) Play section 1 twice
  • Chorus) Play section 1 twice
  • Verse 3) Play section 1 twice
  • Chorus) Play section 1 twice
  • Chorus) Play section 1 twice

At this point, I would like you to practice the structure with all the changes in your own time until you feel confident with the piece. Note that the whole song is quite long, and without someone singing and can feel very repetitive, try singing along (if you can) as you practice.


Now that you have had a chance to play the song by yourself, you should be getting used to the chord changes. Now I would like for you to play along with my guitar track and the vocal tracks. This will feel a little harder as you will have to keep time with my guitar. Focus on playing in time and if you make any mistakes, just restart. Listen to the count on the track for your cue in.

In this part of the lesson you will be playing the exact same TAB that you have played in the last exercise. If you can do this then you have mastered this piece and you really are developing as a player.

Exercise:

Play along with the following guitar and vocal track:

Audio Available:

Audio
Audio vocal track mp3 (5.34 MB)

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Developing your Strumming Hand. It's really coming  

Posted by T ZAMAN in , ,

In today's lesson we have a lot to cover. We will be playing all of the chords that you have learned: A, D and G, and we will be trying a new strum with these chords. By now you should be able to play and change between these three chords. If you followed the lessons carefully you should find these exercises a logical and easy progression from what you have previously done. It's great to have you with us...

Today's lesson is based around trying to play a specific rhythmical strum on the guitar. The first three lessons have challenged your fretting hand. This lesson is going to challenge your strumming hand. Being able to play particular strums and rhythms is an important and often under practised part of playing the guitar. Many musicians get caught up in learning crazy chords or playing speedy scales. This can often lead to the neglect of rhythm which is the basis for all music.

Remember in the last lesson we talked about warming up and using the correct fingering. Before you start this lesson, just try another one of these warm up fingering drills.

This following warm up exercise involves the 6th, 5th and 4th strings (three thickest strings). Once again I would like you to use correct fingering when you are playing this. Remember your index finger is number 1, you middle finger is number 2, your ring finger is number 3 and your pinky is number 4. Play in down strokes and take your time. Try and make each note ring clear. Remember it is better to play slowly and accurately than to sound muddy and unclear.

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 1 (930 KB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (1.96 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 1 (2.53 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (3.48 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 1 (489 KB)

Now that you have finished that warm up pattern it's time to move onto the main part of the lesson which is some work on strumming. Before you start on this I am going to explain some simple music theory to you. Don’t get intimidated by this as it is pretty simple.

You may or may not have noticed that most of the things you have played previously have been in groups of fours or numbers that are divisible by four. Most music is like this and if you don’t believe me turn on your radio. Try and count out in fours while listening to the playing. I am confident that you will be able to count out in fours to most pieces of music you will hear.

So previously when you were strumming up and down you were playing HALF beats. That is why I had you count out, "one AND two AND three AND four AND", to split each beat in half and strum in eights. Just to recap, let's just try one of our previous exercises again.

Once again we are working with the G chord. Strum up and down in a constant rhythm. Keep it slow and accurate. As in lesson 3, I would like you to count out, "one AND two AND three AND four AND", with your strumming.

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 2 (516 KB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (1.14 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 2 (1.41 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (1.90 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 2 (313 KB)

Ok, let's push those boundries a little.

Exercise:

Basically, what I want you to do I skip a couple of beats. In terms of what you have been counting I want you to skip the ‘two’ and the ‘four’ when you are strumming. Watch the video to see what you need to strum or give it a go and see what I mean...


Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 3 (1.04 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (2.71 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 3 (2.82 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (3.90 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 3 (495 KB)

Note that I have put hollow strumming symbols below the tab chart. This is because I want you to make the strum but I don’t want you to hit the strings. When you see the hollow strum symbol, that's what that means. Listen to the count on the JAM track and try and play along. This will feel a little awkward at first, but like everything we have asked you to do, it is achievable. Keep working at it and you will be able to do it. You may notice that the JAM track provided is quite slow. This is because I want you be able to play this perfectly and in time.

Now I would like you continue the same strum but work with the chord A.

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 4 (1.03 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (2.73 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 4 (2.80 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (3.88 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 4 (608 KB)

Cool. By now you should be having no trouble keeping up with the video. Now we will try it one more time slowly with the chord D. If you are still having trouble, try doing the measure then stopping. After stopping, wait, reset yourself, and think about what your doing and try again.

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 5 (1.06 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 5 (2.59 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 5 (2.89 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 5 (3.93 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 5 (712 KB)

Now we are going to do the exact same exercises in the same order but at a quicker pace. Learning to play a song slowly and then learning it again quickly is an excellent method of learning music. You will find that increasing the speed in small increments will allow to play more complex songs than you would otherwise be able to do.

Exercise:

Go back through the last three exercises and complete them at 70 bpm (beats per minute). Try the online metronome at www.metronomeonline.com.


Now I want you to vary your strum a little. What I want you to do is strum that we have been practicing this lesson but this time we are going to open it out a little.

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 6 (1.19 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 6 (3.20 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 6 (3.20 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 6 (4.38 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 6 (690 KB)

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The Art of Chord Movement  

Posted by T ZAMAN in , ,

This lesson continues on from lessons one and two. In lesson one you learnt how to start playing and how to play the chords A and D. In the second lesson you were shown how to read tab. This lesson will be similar to the second part of lesson two, however I plan to introduce you to the chord G. Once you have mastered G, we will try and practice changing between the three chords we have learnt; D, A, and G.

Let's take a look at the G major chord:

Exercise:

With this exercise, I want to get you strumming up and down. I would like to introduce to you a new technique to help with your playing. When you are practicing the lesson above I would like you to count out loud. This sounds easier than it is, but it is something you need to learn and it is an achievable skill. It works like this; on your down strum I want you to count “1,2,3,4,1,2,3,4” and on the up strum I would like you to say “and”. So you should be saying “1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 1 and 2 and 3 and 4”. Most guitar music is broken down into beats of four. This is not something you need to worry about at this stage, but it is something you should be aware of. Try the exercise below and remember to take a look at the video if you have any problems:

G major chord

Tip: You can download a video or audio example of the above exercise to see and hear it for yourself. The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 1 (850 KB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (1.48 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 1 (2.30 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 1 (2.80 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 1 (495 KB)

As you can see the difference between practicing this chord and the previous chords you have learned is that you are doubling up on the strum. The way I would like you to do this is by strumming up when you bring your hand back up. Take your time with this. Watch the video provided and try and play along. Your strum should be constant and in time. The track provided is slow and with a little pratice you should be able to play G with up and down strum.

Now we are going to work on changing between G, D and A. As above, I would like you to continue using an up and down strum and counting out loud. So if you continue with your, “1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and”, it will help make the next lesson a lot easier.

Exercise:

Next I want you to practice going from G to D. This should feel like a realitively smooth and easy chord change. It also sounds good and should with a bit of practice feel very natural. Just to remind you, you should be strumming up AND down while you perform this exercise and counting out aloud, "one and two and three and four and", in time with your strum. Note that each 'and' is written as '+' in the following exercise... This is just so that it fits properly under the TAB.


Tip: You can download a video or audio example of the above exercise to see and hear it for yourself. The download links are below (right click on the link and select "save as"):

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 2 (861 KB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (1.40 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 2 (2.33 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 2 (2.88 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 2 (502 KB)

Adding the up and down strum may mean that this will take a little longer to master than the previous chord changing exercises in lesson 2. Don't worry though, just keep working away at it until you can play along comfortably with the audio track provided.

Now we will move onto the next exercise. This one starts in A and then goes to G. Once again I would like you continue with the up and down strum and the counting aloud as in the previous exercises in this lesson.

Before you do however, I just want to mention a couple of things. You will notice that in the video for this lesson, I play the A chord using a different method than the one that I taught you in lesson 1. I just want to make the point that there are many fingering variations to many chords and none of them are wrong. If you find a way to play a chord that is easier for you, then use it. That said, try playing the A chord the way I play it on the video and see if it works for you.

Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 3 (859 KB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (1.40 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 3 (2.33 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 3 (2.87 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 3 (502 KB)

You're doing great here! For the final exercise we will play all three chords we have learned. Just as a quick note, when you play a group of chords in order it is called a ‘progression’ or a ‘chord progression’. In this progression we will start with a G then change to the D before finally finishing with the A. You will notice in this exercise that the A is played for twice as long as both the D and the G. I have done this so you can count out in fours as you have done in the previous exercises.


Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 4 (839 KB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (1.32 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 4 (2.30 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 4 (2.73 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 4 (484 KB)

I bet you never thought you would read this but; being a guitarist is a lot like being a boxer. In both disciplines your hands are your principal tools. Both guitarists and boxers must put their hands in a difficult and potentially injurious situation to perform their art.

By now you will have come across some of the difficulties and pain that come with learning the guitar. For most of you, just pressing down the strings and trying to play chords will have caused some moderate pain. Most of this pain will be in your fretting hand ( left hand for right handed players). This pain is normally felt in a few places; pain in your fingertips, sore wrists, stiff forearms and pain between your thumb and your fingers. Most of this pain is inevitable and will pass with time.

If you have serious continued pain in your hands then you should contact a health care professional. Repetitive Strain Injuries (R.S.I) and carpal tunnel syndrome are the most common serious problems that guitarists encounter. However for the vast majority of players these problems are not an issue.

The best way to avoid pain when you are playing the guitar is to dedicate some time to warming up. There are many ways you can warm up and every guitar player has a different method. In this lesson I will show you some basic warm up techniques. These techniques will also help you build hand strength and a little bit of speed.

Unlike the previous exercises in this lesson there is no need to continue with the up and down strokes. All the strokes in these two exercises will be single notes using down strokes. It is important to note that in these warm up exercises you will be playing single notes as opposed to chords which you have been practising in this lesson and in lessons 1 and 2.

In this first warm up exercise I want you to get used to using particular fingers. If you look at the diagram below you will see that each finger is numbered. Your index finger is 1, your middle finger is 2, your ring finger is 3 and your pinky is 4.

This following exercise is excellent for warming up, improving hand strength and increasing
co-ordination. You will notice that I have tabbed out some single notes for you to play. Above the TAB I have written some numbers. These numbers indicate the fingers I would like you to use when doing the exercise.



Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 5 (927 KB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 5 (1.44 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 5 (2.50 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 5 (3.05 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 5 (547 KB)

As you can see, this is just a simple ascending and descending pattern on the 1st string (thinnest string). First, you use your index finger, then your middle finger, then your ring finger and finally your pinky. The second part is just the same thing but in reverse.

This second exercise I want to show you involves three strings; the 1st, 2nd and 3rd. It is important to notice the fingering used. This may feel a little awkward and frustrating at first but this is the correct way to play the guitar. Getting in the habit of using correct fingering will pay massive dividends as you progress with your guitar playing. Once again, play this exercise with down strokes only...




Video and Audio Available:

Dial Up Broadband
QuickTime - Exercise 6 (1.07 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 6 (1.70 MB)
QuickTime - Exercise 6 (2.90 MB)
WindowsMediaPlayer - Exercise 6 (3.52 MB)
Audio
Audio mp3 - Exercise 6 (634 KB)

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